Hyperemesis Forced Kate Middleton’s Early Pregnant Announcement

WHAT'S YOUR REACTION?

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1 Here We Go Again

It’s not the first time Will and Kate have had to deal with this. The royal couple had to announce their second pregnancy this past week due to the fact that the Duchess is suffering once again from Hyperemesis gravidarum.

the Duchess is suffering once again from Hyperemesis gravidarum.

Hyperemesis gravidarum, the condition from which the Duchess is again suffering, usually begins between four and seven weeks into a pregnancy, though it can begin at any time within the first 12 weeks. It means Prince George’s sibling is likely to be born in April or May. A spokeswoman for Kensington Palace did mention the Duchess’ due date, but did confirm that she is not yet 12 weeks along.

2 Forced To Announce

The Duchess was forced to announce her pregnancy after having to bow out of several different public appearances recently.The Duchess was forced to go public after deciding on Sunday that she was too ill to attend a planned engagement in Oxford on Monday. Kensington Palace released the news just 48 hours after the Queen and the Middleton family had been told.

The Duchess was forced to announce her pregnancy after having to bow out of several different public appearances

A royal source said that the Duchess was suffering from the “same level of symptoms” as she did when she was pregnant with Prince George. However, since she knew to expect the hyperemesis this time around, she was better prepared and fortunately, has not had to be hospitalized this time around.  Hopefully she is able to handle her illness at home and will not have to be hospitalized at all this time.

3 What Is It?

Hyperemesis gravidarum is diagnosed when a pregnant woman loses more than 10 pounds due to extreme and persistent nausea and vomiting, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Although every pregnancy is different, having hyperemesis gravidarum during one pregnancy may make a woman more likely to have it in subsequent pregnancies, according to Dr. Jennifer Ashton, a practicing OB/GYN and senior medical contributor for ABC News, and it may be worse the second time around.

Hyperemesis gravidarum is diagnosed when a pregnant woman loses more than 10 pounds

“Sometimes subsequent pregnancies have it starting sooner, lasting longer and being more severe,” said Ashton, adding that the debilitating pregnancy disorder is morning sickness “like a hurricane is a little bit of rain.”

The disorder is usually diagnosed about nine weeks into the pregnancy, and in most cases resolves itself by 16 or 20 weeks, according to Dr. Ashley Roman, a professor and OB/GYN at New York University Langone Medical Center. In rare cases, it can last the whole pregnancy. Poor Kate. This hyperemesis does not sound fun at all, and we hope that she gets to feeling better soon.

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Dr. Lynette Weiss is ConceiveEasy's Senior Physician and Scientific Director. She is certified in Obstetrics and Gynecology by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is a fellow of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

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